"

As Black people, we have not had the room to fully cope with our emotional and spiritual issues because we are too busy surviving. Accordingly, my friend’s partner was trying to teach his son one of the key principles of being Black—that pain and trauma are indigenous to our history as African-Americans. We have become accustomed to tolerating our pain.When faced with repeated injustices hurled upon us, we are quick to mutter, “that’s just the way it is.” Or, when faced with glass ceilings and institutional barriers, we tell our children, “that you must always be 120 percent better.” Instead of bull dozing through the pain, how can we teach ourselves, our families, and our friends to make room for their pain while not being swallowed by it?

In many ways, I am trying to learn how to embrace and engage my pain, rather than run from it. In my life, I continually find ways to affirm myself, speak positivity over my own life, and remember to love myself no matter what. This is what healing looks like for me. For others, it will be forgiving the pain folks have caused them. Forgiving themselves, strengthening relationships, or severing them. Regardless of the routes, what we need to remember is that pain is not a temporary thing. It lingers. For the Black community to thrive, I believe we in part, must not only talk about economic justice, but be truly radical by talking about collective healing. Yes, self-care is a hard discussion when one struggles to make ends meet, but whatever room we have to nourish our hearts and minds, we must take full hold of it.

"

Black Folks Must Talk About Healing

By Aaron
@Talley_Marked via Black Youth Project

(via unapproachableblackchicks)

(via unapproachableblackchicks)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. is Assassinated
On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story motel room in Memphis, TN.
Revisit the life and legacy of Dr. King with a special collection from PBS.
A collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Jackie Robinson, Malcolm X, President Barack Obama, and more. The posters, which can be downloaded, printed and shared, can be found here: http://to.pbs.org/1efp1fy

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. is Assassinated

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story motel room in Memphis, TN.

Revisit the life and legacy of Dr. King with a special collection from PBS.

A collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Jackie Robinson, Malcolm X, President Barack Obama, and more. The posters, which can be downloaded, printed and shared, can be found here: http://to.pbs.org/1efp1fy

blackgirlwhiteboylove:

madblackgirl:

black girl, whenever you feel ugly

remember that they want your style

they want your lips, your hips, your hair

your ass, your clothes, your music

your swag, your aesthetic, the way you speak

you’re a walking treasure, literally

they may say they dont want you

but they want everything you have

all of it

Never forget.

(Source: blackfemalepresident, via blackfashion)

The Journalistic Quest to Write An Accurate Story About Bisexuality

autostraddle:

The Journalistic Quest to Write An Accurate Story About Bisexuality

image

The New York Times doesn’t have a shining history when it comes to respectful and accurate reporting on bisexuality; sometimes it needs to be reminded by its readers that bisexuals exist, sometimes it writes about flawed studies that question the existence of bisexuals, or writes about “same-sex experimentation” and “lesbians until graduation”  without presenting bisexuality as feasible…

View On WordPress

nprbooks:

pewinternet:

Did you know: Technology users are generally library users. A common narrative is that Americans are turning away from libraries because of newer technology, but the data shows that most highly-engaged library users are also big technology users. In fact, members of the high engagement groups are more likely to use the internet than lower engagement groups.
A new way of looking at public library engagement in America: http://pewrsr.ch/1iZCrUb

So basically, library lovers have all the fun. 

nprbooks:

pewinternet:

Did you know: Technology users are generally library users. A common narrative is that Americans are turning away from libraries because of newer technology, but the data shows that most highly-engaged library users are also big technology users. In fact, members of the high engagement groups are more likely to use the internet than lower engagement groups.

A new way of looking at public library engagement in America: http://pewrsr.ch/1iZCrUb

So basically, library lovers have all the fun. 

blackboxoffice:

Like fiery eyeball thing, no problem. But don’t even try to imagine a Samoan elf. (x)

via stand-up-comic-gifs

(via blackfashion)

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prisonMarch 14, 2014
Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 
But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.
“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”
Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)
Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.
“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.
“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”
As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.
Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.
Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Michelle Alexander: White men get rich from legal pot, black men stay in prison
March 14, 2014

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping $185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize. 

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

Alexander said she is “thrilled” that Colorado and Washington have legalized pot and that Washington D.C. decriminalized possession of small amounts earlier this month. But she said she’s noticed “warning signs” of a troubling trend emerging in the pot legalization movement: Whites—men in particular—are the face of the movement, and the emerging pot industry. (A recent In These Times article titled “ The Unbearable Whiteness of Marijuana Legalization,” summarize this trend.)

Alexander said for 40 years poor communities of color have experienced the wrath of the war on drugs.

“Black men and boys” have been the target of the war on drugs’ racist policies—stopped, frisked and disturbed—“often before they’re old enough to vote,” she said. Those youths are arrested most often for nonviolent first offenses that would go ignored in middle-class white neighborhoods.

“We arrest these kids at young ages, saddle them with criminal records, throw them in cages, and then release them into a parallel social universe in which the very civil and human rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights movement no longer apply to them for the rest of their lives,” she said. “They can be discriminated against [when it comes to] employment, housing, access to education, public benefits. They’re locked into a permanent second-class status for life. And we’ve done this in precisely the communities that were most in need of our support.”

As Asha Bandele of DPA pointed out during the conversation, the U.S. has 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. Today, 2.2 million people are in prison or jail and 7.7 million are under the control of the criminal justice system, with African American boys and men—and now women—making up a disproportionate number of those imprisoned.

Alexander’s book was published four years ago and spent 75 weeks on the New York Timesbestseller list, helping to bring mass incarceration to the forefront of the national discussion.

Alexander said over the last four years, as she’s been traveling from state to state speaking to audiences from prisons to universities about her book, she’s witnessed an “awakening.” More and more people are talking about mass incarceration, racism and the war on drugs.

Full article

(via blackfashion)

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